Blog

Sanivation: putting waste to work

Sanivation is currently operating in Kenya, placing mobile toilets at households and sending a collection agent to pick up the buckets of waste twice a week. The waste is then taken to the Sanivation center, where a solar concentrator heats the biosolids over 70 degrees Celsius to remove pathogens in the waste. The waste is then further dehydrated in an agglomerator, and turned into charcoal briquettes that are used as fuel for burning.
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e-Waste microfactory

Professor Veena Sahajwalla directs the Centre for Sustainable Materials Research and Technology (SMaRT) at UNSW Australia, delivering scientific and engineering advances in sustainability of materials and associated processes in collaboration with industry. Veena is revolutionising recycling science to enable global industries to safely utilise toxic and complex wastes as low-cost alternatives to virgin raw materials and fossil fuels. As Founding Director of UNSW’s Centre for Sustainable Materials Research and Technology, Veena and her team are working closely with industry partners to deliver the new science, processes and technologies that will drive the redirection of many of the world’s most challenging waste streams away from landfills and back into production; simultaneously reducing costs to alleviating pressures on the environment.
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Anglesey: UK’s first “plastic-free” county

Anglesey, an island off Wales’ northwest coast, has become the UK’s first “plastic-free” county.

Plastic Free Community status was awarded by Surfers Against Sewage after the island met the five objectives set by the marine conservation group.

The movement forms part of the organization’s wider effort to combat plastics in the ocean, which also includes asking individuals to reduce their plastic consumption and lobbying government for new legislation.

“It’s not about removing all plastic from our lives,” Surfers Against Sewage says. “It’s about kicking our addiction to avoidable single-use plastic, and changing the system that produces it.”

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The world’s highest bridge

The Duge Beipanjiang Bridge (also called the Beipanjiang Bridge or the Duge Bridge) is a concrete cable-stayed bridge that carries four lanes across the Beipan River. Connecting Xuanwei in the Yunnan Province and Liupanshui in Guizhou, the bridge reduces travel times between the two cities from four hours to just over an hour.

It was a massive construction project, and the designers kept having to move the final location of the bridge higher and higher to avoid caves and cracking in the karst mountains at either side of the valley.

The eastern tower of the bridge is 883 feet tall, which is up there among the tallest bridges in the world. Even more impressive, however, is the huge expanse between the road deck and the river below. The deck is 1,854 feet—or over a third of a mile—above the average water level of the river. For perspective, the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco has a clearance of about 220 feet. Chicago’s Sears Tower would fit under the Beipanjiang Bridge with 400 feet to spare, while London’s 30 St Mary Axe (The Gherkin) would fit under the bridge three times over.

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